Workplace Safety Articles and News - Disposal - Justrite

Throwing aerosol cans in the trash can cause dangerous aerosol can explosions. But spent cans need to be disposed of somehow. Are aerosol cans recyclable in your municipal recycling program? Find out why adding an Aerosolv aerosol recycling system to your program makes sense.
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Vocational or trade schools strive to produce graduates with a comprehensive education. But during that training, they consume a large amount of product in aerosol cans. Learn why aerosol recycling makes sense for vocational programs.
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Many companies use propane, propylene, mapp or calibration gas cylinders. Spent propane canisters fall under hazardous waste while still under pressure, making them very expensive to dispose. Learning how to recycle propane canisters can help companies save money.
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Aerosol cans are a common staple of modern industry – but is there an easy way to recycle aerosol cans? Because their contents are paints, lubricants, pesticides, etc., the spent cans are considered hazardous waste. Even when “empty” because they almost always have some residual liquid left in the can.
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According to Recycling International, the United States produces 3.5 billion aerosol cans every year. But many users don’t realize recycling spent cans is the most efficient and cost-effective aerosol can waste disposal method.
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The American automotive market is growing. Suppliers provide many vehicle maintenance products in aerosol cans. But, used cans are hazardous waste. For some auto service shops, aerosol can disposal costs are an unwelcome threat to their bottom lines.
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Cleaning equipment parts seems like a simple operation without much risk. But, Plant Engineering highlights the hazards of corrosive cleaning solutions. These types of dangerous chemicals top their list of safety hazards to avoid in manufacturing jobs.

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Laboratories store and handle different chemicals in their daily operation. Some are flammable and some are corrosive, while others are completely inert. One key to laboratory safety is keeping using chemical containers that minimize the risk of spills, fires and toxic vapors. Carboy containers provide these functions.

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Ever wondered if you can just throw an aerosol can in the trash? The answer is complicated. It’s not the can, but the contents of the can that may cause issues. Many cans used in the workplace contain hazardous materials. Either the product, or the propellant used to spray the product is harmful to the environment. Aerosol disposal must be handled carefully.

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Laboratories use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment across a spectrum of industries, including pharmaceutical, industrial, forensic and environmental applications. HPLC creates a mixture of a sample with a solvent to analyze the different components present.

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